Opened 15 years ago

Closed 15 years ago

Last modified 14 years ago

#2432 closed enhancement (fixed)

[with patch, positive review] Add support for Macdonald polynomials, LLT polynomials, Jack polynomials, etc.

Reported by: mhansen Owned by: mhansen
Priority: major Milestone: sage-2.10.4
Component: combinatorics Keywords:
Cc: sage-combinat Merged in:
Authors: Reviewers:
Report Upstream: N/A Work issues:
Branch: Commit:
Dependencies: Stopgaps:

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2432-referee.patch (156.4 KB) - added by mhansen 15 years ago.

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Change History (14)

comment:1 Changed 15 years ago by mhansen

Status: newassigned
Type: defectenhancement

comment:2 Changed 15 years ago by mhansen

Summary: Add support for Macdonald polynomials, LLT polynomials, Jack polynomials, etc.[with patch, needs review] Add support for Macdonald polynomials, LLT polynomials, Jack polynomials, etc.

comment:3 Changed 15 years ago by mabshoff

Once this patch is applied and reviewd we should also close #2427.

Cheers,

Michael

comment:4 Changed 15 years ago by saliola

Cc: saliola@… added

I've started reviewing this patch (and plan to finish it over the next few days). So far I've made it up to ribbon_tableau.py. Here are my comments/questions so far.

--

First some general comments.

Almost all functions have good examples, but some lack descriptions. See, for example, _coerce_impl in the CombinatorialAlgebra? class.

I'd like to see more definitions of the mathematical concepts. (You'll see a bunch of comments to that effect throughout the review.)

-- File specific comments and questions.

combinat.py

  1. CombinatorialObject? does no type checking, is available to the

user, but seems to only want to accept lists. But,

C = CombinatorialObject('word')

works, except str has no iter attribute.

  1. After some operations on CombinatorialObjects?, you don't get back a

CombinatorialObject?. Example:

            sage: c = CombinatorialObject([1,2,3])
            sage: c[0]
            1
            sage: c[1:]
            [2, 3]
            sage: type(_)
            <type 'list'>

Is this the desired behaviour?

  1. Some classes don't have descriptions: CombinatorialObject?,

CombinatorialClass?, FilteredCombinatorialClass?, ....

  1. In FilteredCombinatorialClass?, why doesn't list use self.iterator

instead of self.combinatorial_class.iterator? Same code in both.

--

combinatorial_algebra.py

  1. I think the definition of contains in the

CombinatorialAlgebraElement? class is strange, and doesn't behave the way I would expect it to.

            sage: s = SFASchur(QQ)
            sage: a = s([2,1]) + s([3])
            sage: Partition([2,1]) in a
            True
            sage: Partition([1,1,1]) in a
            False

I would have expected

            sage: s([2,1]) in a
            True

but it's false.

  1. There aren't any examples of constructing CombinatorialAlgebras?,

and I think it would be helpful since it seems to be non-trivial.

  1. Can the basis of a CombinatorialAlgebra? be indexed by any object?

The docstring for _apply_module_morphism(self, x, f) suggests not:

            -- f : a function that takes in a partition (basis element)
                   and returns an element of the target domain
  1. The docstring for _linearize needs to be improved (it mentions only

one of the arguments and not the other). And perhaps it should be renamed to something like _apply_module_endomorphism. Not sure what would be best.

--

composition.py

Some functions are not documented adequately in that they are missing the mathematical definition. For example, the docstring for to_code only states that the function "Return the composition from its code" but does not explain what the code of a composition is.

--

partition.py

  1. [1,2,3] is not an integer partition of 6, but Partition([1,2,3])

doesn't complain.

  1. So the following is wrong.
        sage: Partition([1,2,3]) in Partitions()
        True
    
  2. You need to define what you mean by an integer partition,

because I expected this to be False:

    sage: [0] in Partitions()
    True

And this too:

    sage: [3,1,0] in Partitions()
    True

But I can see why this might be useful, so it needs to be well documented.

  1. Partitions_starting is missing Examples.
  1. Partitions_starting and Partitions_ending are missing explanations.

And explain which ordering is begin used. Perhaps more descriptive names?

--

permutations.py

  1. More out of curiousity than anything: why do
       Permutation([1,2,3])._icondition(2)
       Permutation([3,2,1])._icondition(2)
    

return None as the string?

  1. I don't know what i-switch, i-shift, etc. are, and there is no

definition included, so I can't tell if the doctests are doing the right thing.

  1. CyclicPermutations? doesn't provide a definition, and the term is

used to mean different things: see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyclic_permutation

--

Made it to ribbon_tableau.py

comment:5 Changed 15 years ago by saliola

Here is the second installment of my review. Most of my comments pertain to docstrings, but I did find an error not detected by the doctests. See the comments for the hall_littlewood.py below.

Expect my next (and last) installment tomorrow.

General comments:

As I mentioned before---but I feel it is important so I'm mentioning it again---I would like to see more definitions of the mathematical notions.

Perhaps the fact that you are using caching should be documented.

--

ribbon.py

  1. Type-checking missing.
    sage: r = Ribbon("I am not a ribbon!")
    sage: r
    I am not a ribbon!
    sage: type(r)
    <class 'sage.combinat.ribbon.Ribbon_class'>
    
  1. A definition of what a ribbon is should be included. And what the

argument of Ribbon can be should be explained.

--

ribbon_tableau.py

  1. Type mismatch.
    sage: RT = RibbonTableux([[8,7,6,5,1,1],[3,3,1]], [2,2,2,1], 3)
    sage: r = RT.random()
    sage: type(r)
    <class 'sage.combinat.combinat.CombinatorialObject'>
    sage: type(RT.list()[0])
    <type 'list'>
    

I imagine that the type should be RibbonTableau_class.

  1. Perhaps a basic contains attribute can be defined using list()?
    sage: RT = RibbonTableux([[8,7,6,5,1,1],[3,3,1]], [2,2,2,1], 3)
    sage: s = [[3,3,1],[[1],[0],[0,2,3,0,0],[0,0,2,0,4],[1,0,0,0],[0,0,3,0,0]]]
    sage: s in RT.list()
    True
    sage: s in RT
    <type 'exceptions.NotImplementedError'>
    

--

sf/dual.py

  1. Add some examples to expand showing how to use the new alphabet

feature. Add these lines:

            sage: a.expand(2,alphabet='y')
            2*y0^3 + 3*y0^2*y1 + 3*y0*y1^2 + 2*y1^3
            sage: a.expand(2,alphabet='x,y')
            2*x^3 + 3*x^2*y + 3*x*y^2 + 2*y^3

--

sf/elementary.py

  1. dual_basis has been deleted, so some weird things happen in the

documentation.

sage: e = SFAElementary(QQ)
sage: e.dual_basis?
Docstring:
           Returns the dual basis of the power-sum basis with ...

The examples are for e.

  1. If you use the power sum basis instead of the elementary basis in

the above code, then you get the same docstring (so examples are for e, not p).

  1. Examples for expand should include tests for different alphabets.
    sage: e([3]).expand(4,alphabet='x,y,z,t')
    x*y*z + x*y*t + x*z*t + y*z*t
    sage: e([3]).expand(4,alphabet='y')
    y0*y1*y2 + y0*y1*y3 + y0*y2*y3 + y1*y2*y3
    

--

sf/hall_littlewood.py

  1. The doctests for HallLittlewoodP aren't satisfactory:
    sage: HLP = HallLittlewoodP(QQ,t=0)
    sage: s = SFASchur(HLP.base_ring())
    sage: s(HLP([2,1]))
    <type 'exceptions.TypeError'>: cannot coerce nonconstant polynomial
    

Also note that the following example---probably due to caching---so the doctests need to be careful.

sage: HLP = HallLittlewoodP(QQ)
sage: s = SFASchur(HLP.base_ring())
sage: s(HLP([2,1]))
(-t^2-t)*s[1, 1, 1] + s[2, 1]

sage: HLP = HallLittlewoodP(QQ,t=0)
sage: s = SFASchur(HLP.base_ring())
sage: s(HLP([2,1]))
s[2, 1]

sage: s(HLP([3,2,1]))
<type 'exceptions.TypeError'>: cannot coerce nonconstant polynomial
  1. The Hall-Littlewood polynomials P at t = 0 are the Schur functions

and at t = 1 are the monomial symmetric functions, so this should go into the doctests.

sage: HLP = HallLittlewoodP(QQ,t=0)
sage: s = SFASchur(HLP.base_ring())
sage: s(HLP([2,1])) == s([2,1])

sage: HLP = HallLittlewoodP(QQ,t=1)
sage: m = SFAMonomial(HLP.base_ring())
sage: m(HLP([2,2,1])) == m([2,2,1])

But these don't work because of the above reason.

  1. The Hall-Littlewood polynomials are the Macdonald polynomials at

q=0 (when the root system is of type A), so this should be included as a doctest for both sets of polynomials.

--

sf/homogeneous.py

  1. Include the following examples for expand.
    sage: h([3]).expand(2,alphabet='y')
    y0^3 + y0^2*y1 + y0*y1^2 + y1^3
    sage: h([3]).expand(2,alphabet='x,y')
    x^3 + x^2*y + x*y^2 + y^3
    sage: h([3]).expand(3,alphabet='x,y,z')
    x^3 + x^2*y + x*y^2 + y^3 + x^2*z + x*y*z + y^2*z + x*z^2 + y*z^2 + z^3
    

--

sf/jack.py

  1. The Jack polynomials J at t = 1 are scalar multiples of Schur

functions, so doctest that:

sage: J = JackPolynomialsJ(QQ, t=1)
sage: s = SFASchur(J.base_ring())
sage: p = Partition([3,2,1,1])
sage: s(J(p)) == p.hook_product(1)*s(p)
True
  1. If the partition has more parts than the number of variables, then

the Jack function is 0:

sage: J = JackPolynomialsJ(QQ)
sage: J([3,2,1]).expand(4)
  1. At t = 2, we get a scalar multiple of a Zonal polynomial.
    sage: t = 2
    sage: J = JackPolynomialsJ(QQ,t=t)
    sage: Z = ZonalPolynomials(J.base_ring())
    sage: p = Partition([2,2,1])
    sage: Z(J(p)) == p.hook_product(t)*Z(p)
    True
    

--

sf/macdonald.py

  1. The Macdonald polynomials can be expanded in terms of LLT

polynomials.

  1. Both c1 and c2 have the same description, but do different things:
    sage: sage.combinat.sf.macdonald.c1?
    Docstring:
            This function returns the qt-Hall scalar product between
            J(part) and P(part).
    
    sage: sage.combinat.sf.macdonald.c2?
    Docstring:
            This function returns the qt-Hall scalar product between
            J(part) and P(part).
    
  1. MacdonaldPolynomial_*.scalar_qt claims to convert everything to the

power sum basis, but this is not exactly what it does.

  1. In the docstring for _to_s (in each function), you mention part2,

but it was confusing at first. So I suggest changing it to "a partition".

--

sf/monomial.py

  1. Add the following to examples of expand.
    sage: m([2,1]).expand(3,alphabet='z')
    z0^2*z1 + z0*z1^2 + z0^2*z2 + z1^2*z2 + z0*z2^2 + z1*z2^2
    sage: m([2,1]).expand(3,alphabet='x,y,z')
    x^2*y + x*y^2 + x^2*z + y^2*z + x*z^2 + y*z^2
    

--

sf/powersum.py

  1. See the comment to sf/elementary.py regarding dual_basis.
  1. Add the following to examples of expand.
    sage: p([7]).expand(4)
    x0^7 + x1^7 + x2^7 + x3^7
    sage: p([7]).expand(4,alphabet='t')
    t0^7 + t1^7 + t2^7 + t3^7
    sage: p([7]).expand(4,alphabet='x,y,z,t')
    x^7 + y^7 + z^7 + t^7
    

--

sf/sfa.py

  1. A bunch of functions are missing docstrings, a few are missing

examples.

  1. Change the example for prefix to the following:
    sage: schur = SFASchur(QQ)
    sage: schur([3,2,1])
    s([3,2,1])
    sage: schur.prefix()
    s
    

In the current example, a reader might think that prefix s is the variable that she chose in the first line.

  1. dual_basis: The words "of the power-sum basis" probably should be

removed from the docstring.

--

made it up to sf/skew_tableau.py.

comment:6 Changed 15 years ago by saliola

Here is the final installment of the review.

--

skew_tableau.py

  1. The docstring for SkewTableau? doesn't explain how to use expr.
  1. Personal preference: I don't like that I have to put print in front

of st.pp(). (Same goes for Partition([3,2,1]).ferrers_diagram().)

  1. Perhaps the examples for to_word_by_column and to_word_by_row can

include a pp so the user can visually see how the reading is done:

sage: st1 = SkewTableau([[None,1],[2,3]])
sage: print st1.pp()
  .  1
  2  3
sage: st1.to_word_by_column()
[1, 3, 2]

sage: st2 = SkewTableau([[None, 2, 4], [None, 3], [1]])
sage: print st2.pp()
  .  2  4
  .  3
  1
sage: st2.to_word_by_column()
[4, 2, 3, 1]

And for to_word_by_column and to_word:

sage: st1 = SkewTableau([[None,1],[2,3]])
sage: print st1.pp()
  .  1
  2  3
sage: st1.to_word_by_row()
[2, 3, 1]

sage: st2 = SkewTableau([[None, 2, 4], [None, 3], [1]])
sage: print st2.pp()
  .  2  4
  .  3
  1
sage: st2.to_word_by_row()
[1, 3, 2, 4]
  1. I think it would be nice for every example in this section to have

a pp() statement because people work with SkewTableau? and Tableau visually.

  1. Future consideration: having repr output the result of pp()

instead, like so:

sage: st = SkewTableau([[None, 2, 4], [None, 3], [1]])
sage: st
  .  2  4
  .  3
  1

Or at least defining a switch that can be toggled between the two.

--

split_nk.py

  1. The docstring for SplitNK is wrong.

--

tableau.py

  1. I noticed the following problem with Tableau.shape().
    sage: t = Tableau([[1],[2,3]]); t
    [[1], [2, 3]]
    sage: t.shape()
    [1, 2]
    sage: type(t.shape())
    <class 'sage.combinat.partition.Partition_class'>
    sage: t.shape() == [1,2]
    True
    sage: t.shape() in Partitions()
    True
    sage: [1, 2] in Partitions()
    False
    

This can probably by fixed by adding some type checking to Tableau.

  1. The documentation should mention whether you are using English or

French style for Tableau. I think that the orientation of the ferrers_diagram of a partition doesn't match that of pp of a tableau. (This impression I have is probably related to the missing type checking above in Tableau.)

comment:7 Changed 15 years ago by rlm

Milestone: sage-2.11sage-2.10.4

comment:8 Changed 15 years ago by mhansen

combinat.py

  1. I've changed it so that CombinatorialObject? only accepts lists. This required changes (for the better) elsewhere in the code.
  1. It is intended for indexing and slicing to not return CombinatorialObjects?.
  1. Doctests added
  1. I've removed FilteredCombinatorial_class.list

combinatorial_algebra.py

  1. The definition of contains is intended to be what it is currently. It is primarily for making some of the underlying implementation cleaner. Also, I don't see how your definition of contains would extend to when s([2,1]) is anything more than a single basis element. I've added a docstring explaining the behavior.
  1. I added an example at the top of the file.
  1. Yes, the basis of a CombinatorialAlgebra? can be indexed by any combinatorial class. I've updated the docstring to reflect this.
  1. I've changed _linearize to _apply_module_endomorphism, and updated the docstring.

composition.py

  1. I've fixed the docstring for to_code. Anything else should probably be in a different ticket.

partition.py

  1. Partition() will now check for a valid partition
  1. This will now fail.
  1. I changed it so that partitions cannot have zeros in them. However, Partition([3,1,0]) will still give the partition [3, 1]. There was some code in macdonald.py that needed this functionality, but I've changed it.

4 & 5. I've added docstrings fixing these.

permutation.py

1 & 2. I've added more documentation for the i-moves.

  1. Docstrings changed.

ribbon.py

1 & 2. Fixed

ribbon_tableau.py

  1. Fixed.
  1. Naive contains added.

sf/dual.py

  1. Examples added

sf/elementary.py

1 & 2. Docstring fixed in sfa.py

  1. Examples added

sf/hall_littlewood.py

  1. I fixed this by making sure all the things stored in the cache are done over the most general ring.
  1. Doctests added.
  1. Doctests added to macdonald.py

sf/homogeneous.py

  1. Examples added

sf/jack.py

  1. Examples added
  1. This is currently the way things are:
    sage: J = JackPolynomialsJ(QQ)
    sage: J([1,1,1,1]).expand(3)
    0
    sage: J([1,1,1]).expand(2)
    0
    
  1. I've added this as a doctest.

sf/macdonald.py

  1. Do you want examples added of this? I don't have code written that gives the expansion of the Ht's in Haiman, Haglund, and Loehr 2004.
  1. Docstrings fixed.
  1. Docstrings fixed
  1. Docstrings fixed.

sf/monomial.py

  1. Examples added.

sf/powersum.py

  1. Fixed above.
  1. Examples added

sf/sfa.py

  1. sfa.py is at 100% now.
  1. Example changed.
  1. Docstring fixed.

skew_tableau.py

  1. Docstring updated.
  1. I've made it so that pp() prints the string now. I can't remember the last time I used those methods.
    sage: p = Partition([5,3,1])
    sage: p.pp()
    *****
    ***
    *
    sage: st = SkewTableau([[None, 2, 4], [None, 3], [1]])
    sage: st.pp()
      .  2  4
      .  3
      1
    
    
  1. I've added the examples you suggested.
  1. I'd make this a separate ticket.
  1. This would cause problem with lists of skew tableau among many other things. I intentionally decided to make the repr what it is because it's a dense representation, reflects the internal data structure, and can by copy and pasted. Also, changing the repr would break _lots_ of things.

split_nk.py

  1. Docstring fixed.

tableau.py

  1. Tableau(1],[2,3?) now gives an invalid tableau error which fixes things.
  1. I've added documentation saying that the English convention is used for everything.
    sage: Tableau([[1,2,4],[3]]).pp()
      1  2  4
      3
    sage: Tableau([[1,2,4],[3]]).shape().pp()
    ***
    *
    

comment:9 in reply to:  8 Changed 15 years ago by saliola

Replying to mhansen:

sf/macdonald.py

  1. Do you want examples added of this? I don't have code written that gives the expansion of the Ht's in Haiman, Haglund, and Loehr 2004.

I was mentioning it. I didn't think you had the code written. If you ever do, then it would make for good examples.

skew_tableau.py

  1. I'd make this a separate ticket. [re: using pp() in examples]

It's something I can do. Perhaps I'll ticket it and add the examples once the patch has been merged.

Some typos:

line 441: +the symmetric group algebra of order n(indexed by permutations n) and

line 729: whererever should be wherever

line 3791: convets should be converts

Great job!

Changed 15 years ago by mhansen

Attachment: 2432-referee.patch added

comment:10 Changed 15 years ago by mhansen

I've updated the patch to fix the typos.

comment:11 Changed 15 years ago by saliola

Summary: [with patch, needs review] Add support for Macdonald polynomials, LLT polynomials, Jack polynomials, etc.[with patch, positive review] Add support for Macdonald polynomials, LLT polynomials, Jack polynomials, etc.

comment:12 Changed 15 years ago by mabshoff

Resolution: fixed
Status: assignedclosed

Merged both patches in Sage 2.10.4.alpha0

comment:13 Changed 14 years ago by nthiery

Cc: sage-combinat added; saliola@… removed
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